Tennesse Walker Breed Gaited Horse Information

Tennessee Walkers are graceful, gentle horses bred for their characteristic 4 beat running walk. Known for having a calm and easygoing disposition, Tennessee Walker horses are bred in a variety of colors including black, chestnut, sorrel, bay, champagne and sabiano.

A docile giant, Tennesse Walkers generally stand between 15 and 17 hands tall and weigh anywhere from 900 to 1200 pounds. Tennessee Walkers have a long neck with sloping shoulders, a large head with refined bone structure and small ears. Their short backs combined with their short, strong coupling contributes to an elongated stride.

Tennessee Walkers became popular because of their smooth gait and incredible stamina in addition to their gentle disposition. Even after the advent of the automobiles, owners maintained these animals as they were intelligent, flashy and show worthy. The horse used as the Lone Ranger’s steed Silver, was at times a Tennessee Walker as was Roy Roger’s horse Trigger Jr., Trigger’s successor. Tennessee Walkers are versatile and comfortable with English as well as Western riding, jumping, trail riding and driving.

Tennessee Walker Horses For Sale

Sinatra

We call him Sinatra for he has two blue eyes and a gait that is as smooth as they come. Riding him is like floating on a cloud. He very willingly goes over logs and crosses water. When my friends were running their horses, "Old Blue Eyes" stayed in his gait and kept up with them! You have to earn this horse's respect. When you spend some time with him and show leadership, he will willingly do anything you ask. He has just finished 30 days of professional training. He is a big guy with lots of get up and go. Sinatra is a beautiful and awesome horse.

Breed: Tennessee Walker
Registered: No
Temperament:
1 Calm, 10 Spirited
3
Level of Rider: Intermediate
Color: Black & White
Age: 9 years-old
Sex: Gelding
Height: 16 hh
Price: $6200

Sinatra, Tennessee Walker, Front View Sinatra, Tennessee Walker, Left View Sinatra, Tennessee Walker, Rear View Sinatra, Tennessee Walker, Right View

Little Joe

He is a gentle soul who wants nothing more than to please you. Little Joe bonds easily with people and would crawl up on to your lap if he could. This little guy is fast and keeps up with others in his natural gait. He is comfortable being in the middle or rear of a group on the trail. His biggest fault is he tries too hard to please you. Little Joe needs a confident, kind person to guide him.

Breed: Tennessee Walker
Registered: No
Temperament:
1 Calm, 10 Spirited
3
Level of Rider: Intermediate
Color: Black & White
Age: 12 years-old
Sex: Gelding
Height: 14.2 hh
Price: $4750

Little Joe, Tennessee Walker, Front View Little Joe, Tennessee Walker, Left View Little Joe, Tennessee Walker, Rear View Little Joe, Tennessee Walker, Right View

Mailman

If you want to enjoy a great ride every time - this is the guy for you !! He is a shining example of "been there done that". He has years of trail experience. I put friends, who only know the basics of riding on him and out into the desert we go; they can't stop smiling. I have gone a couple of months without riding him and then when I throw a saddle on him, it is as if no time has passed. He knows what he is suppose to do and does it. He has loads of personality and is the first to come up the fence to greet you. Mailman is a joy to have around and your gain is my loss.

Breed: Tennessee Walker
Registered: Pedigree Available
Temperament:
1 Calm, 10 Spirited
2
Level of Rider: Beginner
Color: Black & White
Age: 14 years-old
Sex: Gelding
Height: 15 hh
Price: $5750
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Mailman, Tennessee Walker, Front View Mailman, Tennessee Walker, Left View Mailman, Tennessee Walker, Rear View Mailman, Tennessee Walker, Right View

Tennessee Walker Horse Breed History

The Tennessee Walker Breed of gaited horses originated in the 1800’s when the Narragansett Pacer and the Canadian Pacer were blended to create a animal that was sure footed and could handle the mountainous terrain. The Confederation Pacer and the Union Trotter were added to the bloodlines during the Civil War. These horses became known as the Southern Plantation Horse or the Tennessee Pacer. Plantation owners rode these horses while they surveyed their vast properties. Later bloodlines from other breeds were added to increase stamina, like the Thoroughbred, Standardbred, and Morgan. In 1885, the stallion Allendorf and the mare Maggie Marshall produced a foal that was named Black Allen. He became the foundation sire of the Tennessee Walking Horse breed. The registry was officially formed in 1935.